Home Blog

Conflict arises over funding for theater and dance arts – Sonoma State Star

0

Sonoma State continues to face frequent budget cuts, which have sparked conflicts over program funding between Dean of Arts and Humanities Hollis Robbins and theater arts and theater faculty and students. dance.

Although the Arts and Humanities program has suffered financial cuts along with many other SSU programs, it has one of the highest budgets on campus. The Center for Performing Arts is one of four programs that are permanently funded by education-related activity funds, or IRA funds, which are paid out of student fees. Through IRA, course fees, and donor funds, SSU’s drama department receives more than 8 times the amount of funding than other campus departments, such as Philosophy, English, Art , communications, etc. This represents 15.91% of the entire IRA budget, or just over $ 565,000 this year, making it the second largest performing arts budget at California State University. .

Students and professors in the program have repeatedly expressed their dissatisfaction, anger and fear over the cuts, which has led to the creation of two petitions against the budget cuts and reallocations last month. “Save the Sonoma State Theater Arts and Dance / Music Departments From Unjust Use of Student Fees” was initiated by dance student Sierra Parkhurst and garnered 550 signatures of support, and “Statement of Support” was initiated by the faculty theater and dance arts and collected 154 signatures.

Students and faculty in the department say they are angry with Dean Hollis Robbins for slashing their budget and fear losing their program. In the description of the petition, Parkhurst wrote: “The undisclosed decision of the Dean of Arts and Humanities to transfer large operational salaries from the United States to IRA funds (teaching-related activities) has have a direct impact on the education of theater arts and dance / music students … She says theater and dance students struggle with a lack of resources to support “fully realized” productions, including costumes, tech support, design team and guest artists. She also adds that there has been a reduction in several staff members resulting in overload of faculty work which impacted students’ ability to feel supported by faculty. Finally, she calls for transparency on student funding, and explains her fear of the ability of the program to exist under these conditions.

Dean Robbins, on the other hand, defended her actions and said she was facing a cut in IRA funding due to a lack of registrations and made the decision to move, not reduce , part of the program funding with the most financial support to SSU and instead use the talents of students on productions instead of hiring expensive external professional services

Drama and Dance Arts Department Chair Christine Cali has expressed her displeasure with recent budget cuts in her department, and she, along with other theater and dance faculty members. dance, claim that Dean Robbins is the only one to blame.

The Faculty of Theater and Dance Arts issued a statement on the use of student fees and the need for administrative oversight, which said: “Since well before the pandemic, [theatre and dance] students have come to feel that their education is in jeopardy because their dean has repeatedly restricted, refused or reallocated IRA funding … These students fear that there is no publicity to bring in the public to attend their work; that there will be no guest accompanists or creators, which is the norm for theater / dance programs; and that the dean will announce outright the cancellation of the season. At the end of the statement, they added, “Unless the university honors the trust of students, Dean Robbins’ actions risk becoming the model for managing IRA funds throughout the university. ” The statement was signed by 9 different faculty members from the Drama and Dance Arts Department.

According to the statement released by the Faculty of Theater and Dance Arts, Dean Robbins, “… [Center for Performing Arts] The IRA will pay permanent full-time staff and executive salaries.

These salaries have historically been paid for by state money, but with this new arrangement at least half of the money will come from IRA funds, reports the Faculty of Theater Arts.

Cali says the department has “… experienced not only the reassignment, but also the withholding of IRA student fees that directly support students in the creative process and performance.” It also has a greater impact on our ability to present live performances for the campus community. Cali also stressed that the Department of Theater and Dance Arts “calls for transparency and accountability in the management of funds.”

Students and other faculty members are also voicing similar concerns – which is clear from the two petitions that have been created.

“[The budget cuts are] super disappointing, ”says Packhurst. “We have to ask ourselves if there will even be a production and how can we create work without money. It’s really frustrating and disappointing, and it makes us, as students, feel like we’re being undervalued.

“We find it difficult to work in this environment because we don’t know what tomorrow can bring,” said Tony Bish, director of the technical theater program.

In response, Dean Robbins said his decision to withdraw some funding from the theater and dance arts was based on a careful review of their finances and his work on the Tuition Fee Advisory Committee.

“I have been the subject of very painful allegations… I have worked for transparency and clarity on the proper use of tuition fees for over three years on the Tuition Fee Advisory Committee. education… There is nothing I can do with funds without the approval of everyone on this team, ”said Dean Robbins.

Assistant Vice-President for Student Affairs Laura Monje-Paulson added, “This committee is not complacent about how funds are spent … We are prepared to be transparent and honest about it. There is proper accountability here.

Dean Robbins raised questions about how the Center for Performing Arts spent funding student registration fees for three years with the committee.

Robbins asked, “Why do geologists or painters at SSU have to spend hundreds of dollars out of pocket on classes while theater students get free costumes?” The theater arts department receives more funding from the IRA than any other program on campus.

When comparing SSU Theater Arts program IRA funding to other CSU campuses, the SSU program receives more funding than almost any other CSU, even though we have fewer registrations than most other CSUs. The only CSU that has more performing arts funding than SSU is Fullerton, and they receive $ 657,831 compared to SSU’s $ 560,000 in funding. Information regarding funding for the theater arts program was provided by Tai Russotti, executive director of the School of Arts and Humanities.

“I think I paid roughly $ 200 to $ 300 for art supplies for my classes this semester and I’m just a minor in art,” said Jenna Zager, fourth-year SSU student. She agrees that it is unfair that the arts department receives much less funding from the IRA than theater and music programs.

Robbins said the theater and dance arts department hired professionals to build sets, make costumes, perform music for shows, etc. She argued that the students who study these things at SSU should be more involved in the presentation of the shows – not the professionals. She also suggests it could increase attendance at theater shows, which typically saw attendance below 10% of theater capacity, according to ticket sales data shared by Russotti.

At a student forum on September 30, Robbins asked students, “Who decides whether musicals have student performers or professional musicians?” The students said they should be able to decide that.

Additionally, the Dean pointed out how many people are working on this funding issue alongside her as a team, and wondered why it is specifically the subject of allegations. The Executive Director of Student Affairs, Erik Dickson, explained the long process of these reallocations during a recent training meeting on the management of IRA funds. “Election brochures with electoral pros and cons written by various students are presented to all other students by email, who then vote on the issue. The results then go to President Sakaki, and the decision is ultimately up to him, ”Dickson said.

“I know I did the right thing for the students. I’m trying to make funding fairer for all arts and humanities programs, ”Robbins said. She then quoted California State University Chancellor Joseph Castro as saying: “‘You have to do the unpopular thing, even if you are going to get clubbed.'”

The administration continues to face an outcry from students and faculty in the theater and dance arts over budget cuts and campus-wide reallocations. In order to address these concerns, they will organize open forums with students and faculty who wish to express their opinions on the matter. On October 11 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Dean Robbins will participate in an open zoom forum to discuss funding for theater, dance and music programs. Students are invited to join the conversation.

Jessica Sternfeld contributed to this report.


Source link

Playbill Vault’s Today in Theater History: October 3

0

1859 Eleanora Duse was born in Italy. One of the main actors of his time, “The Great Duse” championed the realistic playwrights of the early 20th century, and has some of his greatest successes in the works of Henrik Ibsen, notably Ghosts.

1898 Edmond Rostand‘s Cyrano de Bergerac made his Broadway debut at the Garden Theater, with Richard Mansfield in the title role.

1910 Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm opens on Broadway, setting a standard for sugary family meals. He performs 216 performances.

1938 In one of his most acclaimed performances, Helene hayes plays Queen Victoria of Great Britain in Victoria Regina at the Martin Beck Theater.

1961 Elaine Stritch plays cruise director Mimi Paragon in Noël Coward’s musical Sail away, opening at the Broadhurst Theater. Stritch ends the show with his 11 o’clock issue “Why Do Bad People Travel?”

1962 Anthony newley stars in her Broadway musical debut Stop the world – I want to get off at the Shubert Theater. The Allegorical Show About An Everyman was written by Newley and Leslie Bricusse, with Anna quayle co-starring. The song “What Kind of Crazy Am I?” becomes a hit, and the producer David merrick don’t be foolish in their PR tactics. Faced with a mediocre New York Times review of World, it translates the review into Greek and airs it in the print ads for the show. A film version of Stop released in 1966.

1966 Here is love, Meredith Willson’s musical adaptation of Miracle on 34th Street, opens on Broadway at the Shubert Theater. Laurence Naismith plays Mr. Kris Kringle, opposite Janis Paige, Craig Stevens and Fred Gwynne. Young dancers Michael Bennett and Baayork Lee appear in the choir.

1967 Birthday’s party through Harold Pinter opens at the Booth Theater. The absurd game features Henderson Forsythe, Ed Flanders, Alexandra Berlin, Ruth white, and James Patterson (who won a Tony for his performance) in a casting directed by Alain schneider. Variety reports that the basic story is about “a psychoneurotic room with a moronic couple.” It’s actually a couple, Meg and Petey, who harbor an insecure and messy man, Stanley. Chaos occurs when two menacing “friends” show up to help Stanley celebrate his birthday. Birthday parties for almost four months.

1978 Henri fonda made his last Broadway appearance playing a Supreme Court Justice at Jerome Laurent and Robert E. Leethe drama, First Monday in October. The play is about the first female Supreme Court judge, played by Jeanne Alexandre.

1995 Tommy tune breaks her foot for the second time in two years and has no choice but to sing and play her part in Alley of the traveling musicians, which begins its essay at the Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center. Two other people dance for him in the show, but it doesn’t work. Instead, the Broadway opening for November 16 is canceled. The production was plagued by bad reviews from the start, and the $ 6 million debt left by the broken foot and the opening cancellation is not covered by insurance from Tune, which doesn’t. is that $ 3.5 million.

1996 Off-Broadway St. Luke’s Church Becomes A Favorable Place for Vicki Quade and Maripat Donovan’s Late night catechism. The interactive comedy stars Donovan as a nun who lectures on Catholicism. The spectacle will live in the theater for years to come.

1999 Eve Ensler open Vagina monologues Off-Broadway at the Westside Theater. In the solo exhibition, the playwright-performer reveals a series of stories and experiences of different women involving their genitals. Joe Mantello is the production supervisor of the play, which would later become a threesome, starring a long series of female celebrities, after the author’s departure.

2004 Guillaume Gibsonthe game Golda’s balcony becomes the longest-running one-woman show in Broadway history. The stage portrait of Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meier surpasses the previous record holder, Lily tomlin‘s Searching for signs of intelligent life in the universe.

2010 Mrs Warren’s profession, the 1894 George bernard shaw The play so shocking that it was only performed in London in 1902, and only in a private presentation, opens in a new Broadway production at the American Airlines Theater. Realized by Doug Hugues, the stars of the game Cherry Jones like Kitty Warren, and Sally hawkins like his daughter Vivie.

No more birthdays today: Warner Oland (1879-1938). Henri hull (1890-1977). Gertrude Berg (1899-1966). Johnny burke (1908-1964). Ray stark (1915-2004). Gore Vidal (1925-2012). Pierre Fréchette (born in 1956). Jake Shears (born 1978). Carlo Albán (born in 1979). Ashlee Simpson (born 1984). Derek Klena (born 1991).


Source link

The theatrical arts workshops for adults will begin on October 13

0

The Milton Public Library, in partnership with the Milton Theater, has announced its upcoming creative arts class series, Big Kids on Stage: A Theater Arts Workshop for the Boomers.

This free series runs from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays starting October 13 through December 8 at the Milton Theater, 110 Union St., Milton.

Big Kids on Stage invites adults to explore their creativity and imagination with others while developing strong theatrical skills, including improvisation, movement, character development, stage construction through original writing and more. Again. Participants will get to know wonderful people to learn and grow with while developing skills together.

This series will be taught by Melissa Berman, who brings more than 25 years of experience as an innovative, critically acclaimed and award-winning artist teacher and performer in the fields of theater, dance and music. Berman was the Performing Arts Specialist in Residence for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC She is currently working with the Delaware Institute for the Arts in Education as a Teaching Artist.

As a star performer and accomplished musician and arranger, Berman has extensive experience in film, television, commercials and radio, which includes national performing credits.

Registration is limited. For more information and to register, call the Milton Public Library at 302-855-1975 or visit Milton.lib.de.us.


Source link

The theater arts department of the CSUSM presents: “La femme du chapelier”

0

On September 9, CSUSM’s Theater Arts Department presented the first fall semester play, “The Hatmaker’s Wife,” a play written by Lauren Yee and directed by CSUSM drama teacher Jason Heil. . The performance was very special as it is the first in-person event since before the pandemic.

“The Hatmaker’s Wife” centers on a couple moving into their first apartment. Shortly after the arrival of their last objects, the protagonist enters a world that mingles with the past and present of the apartment. The play is a comedic drama loaded with themes such as family, love, and regret.

The play takes on a metaphysical structure, mixing flashbacks and conversations present throughout the plot. The plot is so precise that it can be difficult to sum it up precisely, it would be best if the play was experienced firsthand. “The Hatmaker’s Wife” is also a production that ends with more questions than answers, keeping audiences hooked long after they’ve left their seats.

While the staging takes a minimalist approach, the actors and technical elements shine brightly for the audience. The technical details and actor sections of the piece did well to reinforce each other and completely stand out.

Overall, “The Hatmaker’s Wife” is a charming production; the team worked hard to put it in place.

Those who missed the chance to see the play, luckily there are a few more productions coming later in the semester. These include “Way of the Witch: A New Musical” from October 9-10, “The Thanksgiving Play” from November 17 to 20, and “Don’t Dress for Dinner” from December 9 to 11.

The Cougar Chronicle: The Independent Student News Site at California State University, San Marcos


Source link

Playbill Vault is in theater history today: September 29

0

1921 The operetta Flowering time opens on Broadway. With around twenty themes by Franz Schubert rearranged by Sigmund Romberg, the show reached a then epic series of 576 performances and spawned four simultaneous tour companies, thus becoming a perennial source of money for the Shubert brothers.

1934 George S. Kaufman and Moss deerthe comedy We ride happily introduces the plot innovation of moving back in time from scene to scene. He organizes 155 performances at the Music Box Theater and inspires a 1981 musical through Stephen Sondheim and Georges furth.

1939 Danny kaye debuted on Broadway in The Straw Hat Review, which only has 75 performances despite a cast that includes Jerome Robbins (as a dancer), Alfred drake, and Imogene Coca.

1955 Arthur miller‘s A view from the bridge opens at the Coronet Theater. The drama about Eddie, a simple tank top driven to acts of brutality and despair by passions he cannot comprehend, receives mixed reviews and only lasts 19 weeks. Martin ritt is the production manager, whose stars include Van Heflin, J. Carrol Naish, Eileen Heckart, Jack warden, and Richard Davalos. Despite its disappointing original run, the play has since received four Broadway revivals: in 1983 with Tony Lo Bianco, in 1997 with Anthony LaPaglia, in 2010 with Liev Schreiber and in 2015 with Mark Strong.

1960 Jealous man disguises himself as his girlfriend’s lover – and therefore his own rival – in popular musical Irma the sweet, which opens on Broadway at the Plymouth Theater. Elizabeth Seal wins a Tony Award for her performance in the title role.

1962 After six and a half years, musical success My beautiful lady farm on Broadway. He performed a record 2,717 performances and his gross receipts were $ 20,257,000, a record at the time for a musical.

1962 Future Tony Award winner Roger bart was born. The stage actor creates memorable performances in The producers, Young Frankenstein, Triumph of love, and You are a good man, Charlie Brown.

1983 A choir line becomes the oldest musical in Broadway history. After 3,389 performances, it exceeds Fat. The show continued for a few more years with 6,137 performances in total.

1985 Eugene O’Neillis classic, The ice man is coming, is relaunched at the Théâtre Lunt-Fontanne. The play, about a group of desperate locals at a Lower East Side bar, was originally produced in October 1946 but was overshadowed by Arthur Miller’s All my sons. It did not receive major recognition until it was produced at the Circle in the Square Theater in 1955. The cast of this version included Jason Robards, Jr. as Hickey, the traveling salesman, and was led by Jose quintero. The same actor in the same role with the same director make up the new production.

1975 A work by a New York playwright opens Off-Off-Broadway at St. Clement’s Church, titled Sexual perversity in Chicago. Play wins Obie of the Season for Best New American Play and Playwright David Mamet is becoming a staple in Off-Broadway and Broadway theaters.

1999 The Atlantic theater company celebrates its 15th season by honoring the work of playwright and co-founder David Mamet. The season begins today with a double bill of The water engine and Mr. Happiness. Productions of Sexual perversity in Chicago and The duck variants continue the season, and the topper comes with American buffalo with the other co-founder of Atlantic William H. Macy.

2001 Gloria foster, the African-American actor specializing in classic roles including Medea, Madame Ranevskaya, Mary Tyrone, Clytemnestra and Titania, dies in New York. She was successful at the end of her career in the years 1995 Have our say.

2003 Nearly 80 years of confusion for theatergoers comes to an end when Greenwich Village’s Commerce Street is officially renamed Cherry Lane after the Cherry Lane Theater, which has stood on the short, curving thoroughfare since its founding by the poet Edna Saint-Vincent Millay in 1924.

2009 Hugh jackman and Daniel craig co-starred in Keith Huff’s two-character crime drama, Constant rain, which opens on Broadway at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theater. John crowley directs the play on a pair of Chicago cops whose willingness to blink in the face of corruption leads to disaster.

2016 Simon mcburney’s The encounter, based on the true story of a National Geographic photographer who got lost in Brazil’s remote Javari Valley, opens at the Golden Theater. During the performance, the audience wears headphones and immerses themselves in a world created almost entirely by McBurney’s voice and a virtual radio station full of sound effects. The production’s two sound designers, Gareth Fry and Pete Malkin, receive special Tony Awards for their work.

More birthdays today: Greer Garson (1904-1996). Madeline Kahn (1942-1999). Ian McShane (born 1942). Debbie Shapiro (aka Debbie Gravitte) (born 1954). Francis Jue (born in 1963). Lynnette Perry (born 1963). Darius of Haas (born 1968). Alfie Boe (born 1973). Brad Kane (born 1973). Zachary Levi (born 1980).


Source link

Playbill Vault is in theater history today: September 29

0

1921 The operetta Flowering time opens on Broadway. With around twenty themes by Franz Schubert rearranged by Sigmund Romberg, the show reached a then epic series of 576 performances and spawned four simultaneous tour companies, thus becoming a perennial source of money for the Shubert brothers.

1934 George S. Kaufman and Moss deerthe comedy We ride happily introduces the plot innovation of moving back in time from scene to scene. He organizes 155 performances at the Music Box Theater and inspires a 1981 musical through Stephen Sondheim and Georges furth.

1939 Danny kaye debuted on Broadway in The Straw Hat Review, which only has 75 performances despite a cast that includes Jerome Robbins (as a dancer), Alfred drake, and Imogene Coca.

1955 Arthur miller‘s A view from the bridge opens at the Coronet Theater. The drama about Eddie, a simple tank top driven to acts of brutality and despair by passions he cannot comprehend, receives mixed reviews and only lasts 19 weeks. Martin ritt is the production manager, whose stars include Van Heflin, J. Carrol Naish, Eileen Heckart, Jack warden, and Richard Davalos. Despite its disappointing original run, the play has since received four Broadway revivals: in 1983 with Tony Lo Bianco, in 1997 with Anthony LaPaglia, in 2010 with Liev Schreiber and in 2015 with Mark Strong.

1960 Jealous man disguises himself as his girlfriend’s lover – and therefore his own rival – in popular musical Irma the sweet, which opens on Broadway at the Plymouth Theater. Elizabeth Seal wins a Tony Award for her performance in the title role.

1962 After six and a half years, musical success My beautiful lady farm on Broadway. He performed a record 2,717 performances and his gross receipts were $ 20,257,000, a record at the time for a musical.

1962 Future Tony Award winner Roger bart was born. The stage actor creates memorable performances in The producers, Young Frankenstein, Triumph of love, and You are a good man, Charlie Brown.

1983 A choir line becomes the oldest musical in Broadway history. After 3,389 performances, it exceeds Fat. The show continued for a few more years with 6,137 performances in total.

1985 Eugene O’Neillis classic, The ice man is coming, is relaunched at the Théâtre Lunt-Fontanne. The play, about a group of desperate locals at a Lower East Side bar, was originally produced in October 1946 but was overshadowed by Arthur Miller’s All my sons. It did not receive major recognition until it was produced at the Circle in the Square Theater in 1955. The cast of this version included Jason Robards, Jr. as Hickey, the traveling salesman, and was led by Jose quintero. The same actor in the same role with the same director make up the new production.

1975 A work by a New York playwright opens Off-Off-Broadway at St. Clement’s Church, titled Sexual perversity in Chicago. Play wins Obie of the Season for Best New American Play and Playwright David Mamet is becoming a staple in Off-Broadway and Broadway theaters.

1999 The Atlantic theater company celebrates its 15th season by honoring the work of playwright and co-founder David Mamet. The season begins today with a double bill of The water engine and Mr. Happiness. Productions of Sexual perversity in Chicago and The duck variants continue the season, and the topper comes with American buffalo with the other co-founder of Atlantic William H. Macy.

2001 Gloria foster, the African-American actor specializing in classic roles including Medea, Madame Ranevskaya, Mary Tyrone, Clytemnestra and Titania, dies in New York. She was successful at the end of her career in the years 1995 Have our say.

2003 Nearly 80 years of confusion for theatergoers comes to an end when Greenwich Village’s Commerce Street is officially renamed Cherry Lane after the Cherry Lane Theater, which has stood on the short, curving thoroughfare since its founding by the poet Edna Saint-Vincent Millay in 1924.

2009 Hugh jackman and Daniel craig co-starred in Keith Huff’s two-character crime drama, Constant rain, which opens on Broadway at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theater. John crowley directs the play on a pair of Chicago cops whose willingness to blink in the face of corruption leads to disaster.

2016 Simon mcburney’s The encounter, based on the true story of a National Geographic photographer who got lost in Brazil’s remote Javari Valley, opens at the Golden Theater. During the performance, the audience wears headphones and immerses themselves in a world created almost entirely by McBurney’s voice and a virtual radio station full of sound effects. The production’s two sound designers, Gareth Fry and Pete Malkin, receive special Tony Awards for their work.

More birthdays today: Greer Garson (1904-1996). Madeline Kahn (1942-1999). Ian McShane (born 1942). Debbie Shapiro (aka Debbie Gravitte) (born 1954). Francis Jue (born in 1963). Lynnette Perry (born 1963). Darius of Haas (born 1968). Alfie Boe (born 1973). Brad Kane (born 1973). Zachary Levi (born 1980).


Source link

Today in Playbill Vault Theater History: September 26

0

1898 Composer George Gershwin was born in New York. He writes Porgy and Bess, “Rhapsody in Blue,” Crazy girl, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical, I sing about you, among many other shows and songs.

1911 William Brady’s Playhouse hosts the opening of Bought and paid, a new piece of George broadhurst about a rich man who ends up winning the love of his wife. During the 431 performances of the show, an actor of the show, Frank craven, is raised to the rank of celebrity. Craven continues to play stage manager in the original 1938 Broadway production Thornton wilder‘s Our city. Brooks Atkinson once said that Craven was “[t]the best pipe and pants pocket actor in the business. “

1933 The first great success of the Théâtre Group, Men in white, opens at the Broadhurst Theater. The show, written by Sidney kingsley, is about a doctor who has to deal with decisions about love versus duty. Problems include abortion and social reform, the style of theater for which the Group Theater is becoming known. Lee strasberg is leading a cast of what will become a group of very influential people in theater: Luther adler, Clifford odets, J. Edouard Bromberg, and Ruth nelson. Elia Kazan has only one line, “Hello, honey.” He won the Pulitzer Prize for theater in 1934 and served as a model for all future hospital dramas.

1957 “It all started tonight” at the Winter Garden Theater as West Side Story opens. The Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, and Arthur Laurent musical is based on Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet, but New York’s teenage gangs pitted against each other instead of Verona’s dueling families. It includes classic songs such as “I Feel Pretty” and “Somewhere”. The show is choreographed and directed by Pierre Gennaro and Jerome Robbins, who proposed the original concept for the series in 1949: “East Side Story”. The room has evolved, with new music, a new place, and a new ethnicity, to become what it is tonight. Larry Kert, Carol Laurent, and Chita rivera Star. A film version starring Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer and George Chakiris (who was a member of the original London cast) was released in 1961.

1968 Robert shawthe drama The man in the glass cabin opens, starting a six-month run that earns him 1969 Tony Award nominations for Best Play, Best Direction (Harold Pinter) and best actor in a play for Donald Pleasance, who plays a Nazi war criminal on trial.

1985 Lily tomlin stars in Jane wagnerthe solo game of Searching for signs of intelligent life in the universe, opening at the Plymouth Theater for a 391-performance run. Tomlin’s performance earned her the 1986 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play. 15 years later, Tomlin returned to Broadway in a revival of the play at the Booth Theater.

1998 Matthieu bournethe newly choreographed theatrical version of the ballet Swan Lake, a hit in both London and Los Angeles, begins its Broadway tour at the Neil Simon Theater. The dance / theater performance, with men dancing the swan roles usually assigned to women, is co-produced by Cameron Mackintosh and Catherine Doré. Bourne wins two Tony Awards for the show (for director of a musical and choreographer of a musical) despite the show’s ineligibility as a musical. “I am absolutely amazed,” Bourne said in his acceptance speech. “Best director of a musical that’s not even a musical.”

2013 Cherry Jones, Celia Keenan-Bolger, and Zechariah Quinto are a family adrift in an ocean of memories in a Broadway revival of the acclaimed 1945 drama by Tennessee Williams Glass factory, opening at the Booth Theater. The critically acclaimed production is directed by Jean Tiffany.

2015 In your arms, a “dance-theater musical” with a score by Ragtime and Seussical composer Stephen Flaherty, opens at the Old Globe Theater in San Diego, California. The show consists of ten vignettes written by Douglas Carter Beane, Nilo Cruz, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, David Henry Hwang, Rajiv Joseph, Terrence McNally, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage and Alfred Uhry.

2021 Fifteen months after the originally scheduled date, the 74th annual Tony Awards are held at the Winter Garden Theater, the first time the ceremony has returned to a Broadway theater since 1999. Audra McDonald hosts the awards, which air on Paramount +, a premiere of the Tony Awards. Leslie Odom, Jr. hosts a concert celebrating Broadway’s comeback on CBS right after. Reflecting a season cut short by the COVID-19 pandemic, only 14 plays and four musicals are eligible for the evening’s honors.

More birthdays today: TS Eliot (1888-1965). Philippe Bosco (1930-2018). Mary Beth injured (born 1946). Ben Shenkman (born 1968).


Source link

Playbill Vault is in theater history today: September 25

0

1928 Chee-Chee, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart’s musical about castration in ancient China, opens with scathing reviews and ends after just 31 performances, the team’s shortest series.

1935 Winter cover, Maxwell AndersonThe verse drama of a man determined to seek justice after his father’s abusive execution begins on Broadway at the Martin Beck Theater. Featuring Richard bennett, Eduardo Ciannelli, and Burgess Meredith, it presented 179 performances before going on a national tour and returned to Broadway for 16 more performances after winning the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best American Play. In response to the presentation of the Pulitzer Prize to The idiot’s delight more Winter cover, New York Times drama critic Brooks Atkinson writes, “If Winter cover does not mean more for the arts and theatrical thought of today and tomorrow than The idiot’s delight– in short, if it’s not a better play now and always – then, as John Anderson said in his famous Critics Circle Award waiver, “I’m Admiral Dewey.

[1945[1945 Despite reports of poor play and poor production quality, the new Tennessee Williams and Donald windham to play, You touched me, opens at the Booth Theater, starting a series of 109 moderately revised performances. Williams and Windham wrote the play based on a DH Laurent story for the stars Montgomery Clift, Edmond Gwenn, and Marianne stewart.

1961 Frank Fay, the Vaudevillian and star of Harvey, dies at age 69. The actor, who was once married to Barbara stanwyck, had been confined to a hospital the previous week in Santa Monica, California and found legally incompetent.

1963 John osborne‘s Luther, the story of the priest who started the Protestant Reformation, opens on Broadway, en route to a 211-performance run and the 1964 Tony Award for Best Play.

1963 Sammy Davis, Jr. is reported in Variety as having refused Laurence Olivier‘s offers to be Iago to his Othello. Davis feels he’s just not ready for the dramatic demands of the role.

1979 Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice are the princes of Broadway as a new musical, Evita, opens at the Broadway Theater. The highly successful musical continues to tour for 1,567 performances. Patti LuPone stars like Eva Peron, with Mandy patinkin as Che Guevara, the quasi-narrator of the musical. Clive Barnes of the New York Post reports that “Evita is a breathtaking and exhilarating theatrical experience, especially if you don’t think too much about it. “

1997 Riverdance, the showcase of Irish dance and music which sold out in Dublin and London in 1995, returns to New York for a third edition at Radio City Music Hall. The show, which had two performances in 1996, returned once again to the Manhattan site in 1998 before finally resuming itself for an official performance on Broadway from March 16, 2000 until August 26, 2001.

2003 By a macabre coincidence, Edward Said, the Palestinian-born professor at Columbia University who was the likely model for a character in the play Omnium Gathering, died, the same day on Therese Rebeck and Alexandra Gersten-Vassilaros the drama opens Off-Broadway. Said was 67 years old and suffered from leukemia.

2008 Harry potter movie star Daniel radcliffe debuts on Broadway opposite Tony and Olivier Award winner Richard griffiths in a revival of Equus. Peter ShafferTony’s award-winning drama tells the story of a psychiatrist (Griffiths) who becomes engrossed in the bizarre case of a young man (Radcliffe) who blinds a stable of horses.

2011 Perfect crime, Warren Manzi’s long-running thriller, which opened in 1987, is celebrating its 10,000th off-Broadway performance. The cast includes original actor Catherine Russell, who has been on the show for 24 years, securing a place in the Guinness Book of Records.

2018 The world premiere of Theresa Rebeck Bernhardt / Hamlet opens on Broadway at the American Airlines Theater. Janet McTeer plays the pioneering 19th-century French actress Sarah Bernhardt, who played the title role in Hamlet in 1899.

2018 Merle Debuskey, one of the most prominent publicist to ply his trade on Broadway, and right-hand man to Joe Papp during the early decades of the New York Shakespeare Festival, dies at the age of 95. He has represented over 500 shows on Broadway and Off-Broadway. during his career, and for 25 years was president of the union of press officers ATPAM.

More birthdays today: Charles B. Cochran (1872-1951). Harriet hoctor (1905-1977). Robert wright (1914-2005). Marc Hamill (born 1951). Christophe reeve (1952-2004). Jayne Houdyshell (born 1954). Michael mcgrath (born in 1957). Tate Donovan (born 1963). Catherine zeta jones (born 1969).


Source link

UND Theater Arts Department Kicks Off Season With ‘Silent Sky’

0

The show runs from Tuesday to Saturday September 28-Oct. 2, at the Burtness Theater. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m.

Brad Reissig, associate chairman of the department, describes the play as “a heartfelt, historic story of a woman who shot for the stars.”

In the lead role, Erin Chaves, a graduate in musical theater, plays Henrietta Leavitt. Production is directed by Emily Cherry Oliver, with additional direction by Emily Wirkus. The other cast members are Stevee Wittlieb, Kyle Mason, Piper Sommer and Anissa Oveson.

Tickets, $ 20 for adults and $ 10 for students, are available online at https://burtness.und.edu or by calling (701) 777-2587.

Newsletter subscription for email alerts

At the Burtness Theater, members of the public are required to wear masks, due to UND policy on the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Silent Sky,” written by Lauren Gunderson, explores the universal themes of romance, history, feminism and bigotry.

When Henrietta began working at Harvard Observatory in the early 1900s, she was not allowed to touch a telescope or express an original idea, Reissig said. Instead, she joins a group of “computer” women, plotting the stars for a renowned astronomer who calculates projects in “girl hours” and has no time for polling theories of women.

While Henrietta in her spare time attempts to measure the light and distance of the stars, she must also take the measure of her life on Earth, trying to balance her dedication to science with family obligations and the possibility. love, he said.

The true story of astronomer Henrietta Leavitt “explores a woman’s place in society at a time of immense scientific discovery, when women’s ideas were rejected until men claimed credit”, said Reissig.

In partnership with the Northern Sky Astronomical Society and the International Dark Sky Association, the UND Theater Arts Department invites members of the public to join the cast and crew of “Silent Sky” to exit the Burtness Theater after the performance. NSAS members will have telescopes to see the night sky and the universe through Henrietta’s eyes, Reissig said.

A campaign to turn off the lights in this part of the UND campus after the show will also be organized to help reduce light pollution and promote further immersion, he said. “It’s an experience not to be missed.

Members of the production team are: Camilla Morrison, costume, hair and makeup design; Brad Reissig, stage design and lighting; and Patrick Reading, technical director and sound design.

The other members of the production team are: Dylan Merritt, Otto Lieder, Alex Rice, Tacy Crawford, Tyler Hebert, Skyler Mack, Alex Rice, Ariel Long, Kyle Mason, Amy Hahn, Jessie Grabouski, Daniel Jung, Anne Mitchell, Anissa Oveson, Camilla Morrison, Morgan Shambaugh, Olivia Stewart, Zachary Murphy, Brigitte Froslee, Grace Henneman, Gyu Ri Kim, Robert Cooper, Michael Toenies, Gretchen Osweiler, Teagan Leusink and Marilyn Gregoire.


Source link

USU Department of Theater Arts announces 2021-22 season – Cache Valley Daily

0

LOGAN – After a year of dark stages and virtual presentations due to the coronavirus, the Department of Theater Arts at Utah State University has announced a full show schedule for its 2021-2022 season.

The first big stage production of the season will be Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare in mid-October, following an unprecedented digital showcase produced by the lighting design and projection students of the department.

Julius Caesar will involve each of our student actors, ”according to Richie Call, associate professor of theater. “So we decided not to put on a show in September that would compete for the casting.

“Instead, (Professor) Bruce Duerden is using this production niche as a way for his lighting and design students to essentially put on a cool light show. The idea is to show the things they’ve learned over the past year that don’t always show up in the shows we produce.

This technical program, entitled Introspection, will use a poem written by one of its designers as the source material. It will premiere at 7:30 p.m. on October 1 and 2 at the Caine Lyric Theater in downtown Logan.

The next USU performance will be the bard’s 1599 dramatization of Julius Caesar’s assassination and its aftermath from October 19-23 at the Morgan Theater on the university campus.

Julius Caesar is one of Shakespeare’s best-known works and is loved by directors for its flexibility in terms of schedule and costumes. This versatility was perhaps best demonstrated by a 1937 theatrical production directed by Orson Welles which drew parallels with the growing threat of European fascism at the time.

Julius Caesar will be chaired by USU professor Michael Shipley.

Next on the USU calendar will be Miss Bennet: Christmas in Pemberley, a 2016 feminist drama written by Lauren Gunderson and Margot Melcon.

The play is a sequel to Jane Austin’s novel “Pride and Prejudice” which focuses on the efforts of Mary, middle sister Bennet, to define herself in a male-dominated society.

Miss Bennet: Christmas in Pemberley will be directed by Tarah Flanagan and staged December 2-8 at the Morgan Theater.

At the start of the spring semester, Moors will be chaired by Paul Mitri, the chair of the USU Theater Arts Department.

Written by Jen Silverman, Moors is a dark comedy that parodies the blurry line between eccentricity and madness when a pair of isolated sisters have too much time and imagination on their hands.

The play will be presented February 11-18 at the Caine Lyric Theater.

In early March, Professor Matt Omasta will lead Get closer to baby by Y. York.

Based on the award-winning novel for young adults by Audrey Couloumbis, Get closer to baby is a drama about two sisters who come to terms with the death of a brother.

Get closer to baby will take place March 2-4 at the Morgan Theater.

USU theatrical season to finally end with production of the musical Dolly Parton 9 to 5.

This show is based on the familiar 1980 film of the same name, with additional music and lyrics by Parton and a screenplay by Patricia Resnick.

9 to 5 will be directed by Valarie Rochelle and will take place April 15-23 at the Morgan Theater.

USU’s Department of Theater Arts will also be hosting three events in its series of play readings during the 2021-2022 academic year.

The first of these events will be a reading of Women by Chiara Atik, a comedy that puts a contemporary twist on the March sisters of Little woman.

This reading is scheduled for the Black Box Theater on the USU campus on October 29-30.

The subject of the other two coin reading events will be announced at a later date.






Source link